Dog Bites
If you receive a personal injury as a result of a dog bite (sometimes can be extremely severe), you might be entitled to compensation by suing the owner and hopefully the owner will have insurance. Owning a dog can be a very rewarding experience. However, dog owners should be careful that their adorable pooch is covered by their home insurance.

Unfortunately, there has been a number of high profile incidents where dogs have bitten children causing serious injuries and sometimes even death.

In the US, dog bites accounted for more than one-third of home insurance claims paid in 2011, according to USA Today. It is a worrying trend that may catch on here in Ireland.

The Control of Dogs Act 1986 is the principal legislation in Ireland governing the liability of owners for their dogs. It imposes a strict liability on dog owners where the offending dog causes damage to a person or to livestock. Strict liability means that the dog owner will always be held responsible even where the dog had never bitten a person before.

James Seymour, a solicitor with experience in this area of litigation, advises all dog owners to immediately check with their home insurance provider that their dog is covered by their home insurance. He also advises that dog owners should also ensure that their dog is not allowed out unaccompanied or to be unsupervised in the presence of small children because they face criminal prosecution if their dog causes harm to any person.

“Please remember that no matter how obedient and gentle your dog is, he/she is still an animal and can be unpredictable if frightened or harassed, and it is a dog’s natural defence mechanism to snap or bite.”

To quote USA Today’s report “the average cost of dog bite claims in the US was $ 29,396 in 2011”. Here in Ireland we are already seeing an increase in claims due to the fact that more people own dogs, they live closer to one another and there appears to be a lax control of dogs which allows them to come in to contact with small children, which can have awful consequences.

For more information or to arrange a consultation, please contact:

</p>
<div align="center">Emer Mulry</div>
<p>

Emer Mulry

Solicitor

T: (091) 567 545 (Galway)
T: (01) 488 3322 (Dublin)
E: EmerMulry@berwick.ie

For further information or to arrange a consultation, please contact James Seymour on jamesseymour@berwick.ie

 

Holiday Accidents
If you are injured on holiday, you might be entitled to compensation. For further information click here.

Fatal Injury Claims

Where a person dies as a result of the wrongful act of another a case may be pursued against that wrongdoer. This is called a fatal injury claim. A common example is where a person dies in a car accident, or where a pedestrian is fatally struck.

Who can take such a case?
A case for fatal injury can be taken by dependants of that deceased person. To be considered a dependant you must show that you have suffered a financial loss or a mental distress as a result of the deceased’s death and you must be related to the deceased as a spouse, a child, a brother, a sister, step-brother, step-sister or a grandchild, for example. Only one fatal injury case can be taken against the wrongdoer so your personal injury solicitor will ensure that all dependant parties are included.

What is the time limit for taking this type of case?
Under Statute Law, a relevant party has either (a) two years from the date of death or else, (b) two years from the date of knowledge of the person for whose benefit the action is brought, whichever is the latest. In some special circumstances this time can be extended.

If you have lost a family member as a consequence of the wrongdoing of another, and may be entitled to compensation, please feel free to contact us for a no obligation consultation.

For more information or to arrange a consultation, please contact:

</p>
<div align="center">Emer Mulry</div>
<p>

Emer Mulry

Solicitor

T: (091) 567 545 (Galway)
T: (01) 488 3322 (Dublin)
E: EmerMulry@berwick.ie